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Old 21-12-07, 00:45   #31
George_Hanson
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I don't know if I mentioned it here, but I advice you to read "Clockwork Orange", this book got me fixed for a couple of days.
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Old 21-12-07, 01:36   #32
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Damn, I thought the thread was about bookmaker disscusions. lol

I read when I can, but definetely not enough. And in general I have bad memory so I forget about the book after a while...

I like to read classics, not modern writters. Guess cause want to escape from reality...

Grew up with Hesse, then somehow I.B.Singer took my attention and fell in love with his novels and way of writting. Then Coelho, but haven't read many of his books. Just Alchemist, On the river..., and 11 minutes.

Oh, and lately I'm reading Danielle Steel and I love it. lol
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Old 21-12-07, 02:18   #33
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Coelho sucks, naive books, I didn't like it.
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Old 21-12-07, 04:43   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George_Hanson
Coelho sucks, naive books, I didn't like it.
yeah man ....that's true
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Old 21-12-07, 16:44   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kamei24

I like to read classics, not modern writters. Guess cause want to escape from reality...
Great classics to me are ones from Jules Verne, like "From the Earth to the Moon" "Around the World in Eighty Days" "Under The Sea" etc. Very entertaining books, suitable for all ages.
Also funny in the sense how technology were expected to develope in the future in the books, compared how it came to be in reality.
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Old 24-12-07, 19:53   #36
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my last book was Orwell`s 1984 and now i`m reading The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. i highly recommend both of them of them
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Old 24-12-07, 23:40   #37
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"Crime and Punishment" by Dostoievski was a great book, i highly recomand it.
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Old 25-12-07, 01:48   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldeneye_hd
"Crime and Punishment" by Dostoievski was a great book, i highly recomand it.
Indeed. I also believe that its a great book.
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Old 25-12-07, 10:35   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firewall
Quote:
Originally Posted by George_Hanson
Coelho sucks, naive books, I didn't like it.
yeah man ....that's true
Here comes the anti-snob band...lol
I'm sure that if no Holliwood blondies had red it and loved it, the Alchemist would be your fav book both.
But of course, it's impossible to like the same thing as the shallow American ppl so it might be a stupid book, right?lol

When i red the book i loved it. Then came the big cheering about it from all kind of actors and singers and the "moral" book reviewers started to go against it because of the same reasons above, nothing really connected with the book itself, just hating the fact that ppl stamped "stupid" likes it as well.

I'm far from this stuff, i judge the book by the text and this one i liked a huge lot. Call me stupid...
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Old 25-12-07, 12:51   #40
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latso is right, but not entirely. Surely there are some people that have this kind of attitude because of those reasons, but the thing that I didn't like about the book was it's message. Of course I enjoyed reading, and I did it twice, just to be sure I get all the points. It was well and nicely written, but the message... I don't agree with all that 'Maktub - it was written' stuff, and although I respect Coelho's view.... just not one of my favorites.
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Old 25-12-07, 14:03   #41
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Beautiful a highbrow discussion page for 'low life gamblers' like ourselves, what will the outside world think!!!

If we are recommending good books may I suggest The Road By Cormac McCarthy. Film buffs may see they have released a film version of one of his books "No Country for Old Men". He is an incredibly descriptive writer with a very dark outlook on things but I mean seriously hard to put down books.

I must say I am averse to anything Dan Brown puts on paper, I am big in to history books and older Detective thrillers and what becomes very apparent is Brown is a thief with one single talent and that is to repackage other peoples work and pass it off as his own. My apologies but thats how I feel about that.
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Old 25-12-07, 14:35   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IGUANA
latso is right, but not entirely. Surely there are some people that have this kind of attitude because of those reasons, but the thing that I didn't like about the book was it's message. Of course I enjoyed reading, and I did it twice, just to be sure I get all the points. It was well and nicely written, but the message... I don't agree with all that 'Maktub - it was written' stuff, and although I respect Coelho's view.... just not one of my favorites.
buh, i had a mile long answer here but i mistook smth and went erased... ops:
Anyway, my point was that - yes i agree that if the message is smth ppl prioritize, then it might be seen as a bad ne.
But for me the most important things are - the style of writting and the story.
Even if the story is boring, the book might be a great one. Just like Airport by Arthur Hailey. The story is common but the style makes you read it till the end, especially after page 70...lol

I might love a book which gives the point of view of a terrorist or a suicidal guy. The message is not the first important thing for me, i know what is right and what is wrong so the two other points are what matters to me.

So, i loved the Alchemist. I agree that reading it more than 2 times is a waste of time but it was beautifully written and the story was interesting as well till the end.
It makes you think. And even if it tries to lead you on a way of seing things that is not your own, you are not obliged to follow. You just enjoyed reading the book and at the end it made you think, it made you or changing your mind about some things and seing it from a different angle, or realizing that your point of view is the right one by not agreing with the message.

In both cases, for me it is an important and interesting book. Not a classic but a must read.

Cheers
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Old 18-02-08, 12:44   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arsenalno1

How about sharing a chapter with us then? A little teaser...
Good idea, I think I'll do it... but it will take a couple of days, so that I can translate a few passages in English, as I'm writing it in Romanian. But I think I can upload a preview tomorrow
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Old 18-02-08, 23:35   #44
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Wow, a lot of books mentioned which I've read or are on my to-read-list (which is so long btw that I will only be able to catch up with it in this lifespan when I get some more spare time by producing many VERY profitable months of betting ).
- arsenalno1 started the thread with 'Veronika Decides To Die' by Coelho which I liked as well - I also read 'The Alchemist' and 'The Devil And Miss Prym' - good choices, too;
- George_Hanson's approach to stick with four/five books is an -errhm- interesting idea - nonetheless I fully agree that 'Catcher In The Rye', '1984' and 'Clockwork Orange' are fantastic to read and re-read. I could imagine that you like Kafka, too, George?
- 'The Dark Elf Trilogy' and the other books mentioned by arsenalno1, arbiter and bside do sound as if they are worth a look if I will ever get back to fantasy novels. Years back I was a fan of Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels, the 'Enwor'-Saga (Hohlbein), 'The Dark Company Chronicles' (Glen Cook) and Karl Edward Wagner's 'Kane', to name a few - esp the latter two force the reader to sympathize with rather evil characters which I always found to be much more interesting than reading about some goodie-goodie guys. And btw: I'm pretty sure that the user "Pfandleiher" who is hanging around here from time to time, derives his nick from the german translation of the character Pawnbroker of 'The Dark Company'.
- With 'Dune', like Iguana already pointed out, F.Herbert wrote a masterpiece. It's kinda hard though to get through all six books (I think I made a break of almost two years between 4th and 5th). Great film by Lynch btw - Baron Harkonnen left a deep impression ("That flying fat man!")
- latso named numerous authors I spent some time with; I remember when I read Kerouac's 'On The Road' for the first time when I was about 16-17 years old - I read the complete book in one session.
- @ Dostojewski: I didn't finish 'Crime&Punishment' (may try again); I've read 'The Idiot' which "gains a momentum like a huge, slow landslide". But you def need patience with those books.

Some all-time favs I can think of right now:
- Mikhail Bulgakov 'The Master And Margarita'
- Paul Watzlawick 'How To Fail Most Successfully' (there are times when I seem to be an expert in a betting related sense ) and 'The Situation Is Hopeless But Not Serious' (description: "For those who aren't talented enough to create their own hell, this book offers help and encouragement." LOL);
- William Gibson 'Neuromancer Trilogy' (it becomes more and more uptodate and was of immense influence)
- Antoine de Saint-Exupéry 'Le Petit Prince' (and at least I want to read 'Vol de nuit', too);
- Laurence Sterne 'The Life And Opinions Of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman' (the language, the writing style, the story - and it contains the longest curse I've ever heard of....);
- Heinrich Mann 'Professor Unrat' (='The Blue Angel'; I can't stop laughing, esp at the beginning when school procedures are described);
- Sean McGuffin 'Der fette Bastard' (='The fat bastard', a schizoid, pseudo-autobiographical work never published in english because no publisher accepted the script ; I also read 'In Praise of Poteen' and started to read 'The Guineapigs'; sadly McGuffin died 2002 - "Beaten, but unbowed"! link: http://www.irishresistancebooks.com/john.htm )
- Almost everything by Iain Banks ( http://www.iain-banks.net/ ; it's somewhat difficult to describe - some books are plain sf, others are kind of thrillers - strange stories; I like the writing very much), John Steinbeck (I started out ten years ago with 'Tortilla Flat' and every once in a while I read another one), Albert Camus, Luis Sepulveda (!!!), Philippe Djian ('Betty Blue'-trilogy is well-known and there is more where that came from - kind of a french Bukowski/Kerouac-style), Herbert Rosendorfer ('Letters Back To Ancient China', 'German Suite', etc), TC Boyle (just finished 'Talk Talk', great reading as usual), Stanislav Lem (some time ago I even watched both 'Solaris' films; normally I hate films when I already have read the book, but in this case I think that the russian film directed by Tarkovsky is simply great and even the Soderbergh remake with Clooney has its moments).

Right now I'm reading 'Philosophie der Lebenskunst' by Wilhelm Schmid (='The Philosophy of the Art of Living' - looks like it is not available in english).

@Iguana: yeah, throw some pearls to us, so we can criticize ....

ps_sheesh, that got longer than I thought now....
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Old 21-02-08, 15:10   #45
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so, as I promised, here are some lines from my novel:

"The Tower of Hope was the tallest tower of the Arcer castle. Tall, grayish, marked by the weather, but with all this, it still stood lordly over the castle. It was like a sentinel of Arcer, watching every move, seeing everything that happened in the city and around it. Watching the horizon from one of the tower's windows, the king closed his eyes, feeling the soft breeze, and suddenly, all his problems seemed far away. He saw himself sitting in an orchard, under the blooming trees. The flower's fragrances were floating in the air, pervading all of his senses. He felt in his nostrils the smell of the anukas flowers, the slushy perfume of the Korpus, or the fragrance of the red Erutes flowers. And besides the euphoria caused by the floral perfume, he had Arinna beside him. Honey seemed to be pouring out of her eyes, and he couldn't stop looking at her.
*********
Vertax watched from his tower Ediron's departure. He left the Grey-feather bastion on top of a proud royal griffin. The morning sun was shining, causing Ediron to shine along. Dressed in his silvery armor, the sword Sanir was hanging on his waist. The famous sword, inherited from his grandfather, was a little bended, while the hilt was shaped like two claws. In the sunlight, the sword had hues of fire. Ediron was wearing a linked hood, completing his great image, imposing respect to anyone.
*********
Suddenly, one of those soldiers lifted his head, starring right in Ediron's eyes. He grasped the hilt of his sword and took a backward step, trying to cope with the soldier's ice cold glance, which seemed to fasten him in place. Only a few moments lasted this clash of eyes, but for Ediron these moments seemed like an eternity. the oppressive silence was only making it harder for the general to endure. A sinister smile appeared on the soldier's face, while Edrion was trying to take a quick and correct decision. All of a sudden, several noises managed to break the lugubrious silence: noises of doors opening, of weapons, of steps and war shouts. They were surrounded.
"Defend yourselves" managed to shout Ediron before having to block the enemy's first sword stroke. Two-three moves and Ediron thrusted his sword deep into his opponent's wombs. The first one fell, but many more were coming towards him. The general of Torag was bravely handling his sword, slaughtering enemies left and right. Behind him, he could hear the sounds of the clash between his soldiers and those from Nurdoth. He was hearing the sound of metal on metal, shouts of anger, of rage and the sounds of dying griffins. Ediron blocked two more strikes and, with a simple twist of his hand, he beheaded another enemy."

waiting for opinions and criticism
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Old 22-02-08, 09:22   #46
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"....Arinna...honey pouring....*** "CUT?? - damn it, that ain't fair! Just when they are about to get it on! I knew, I should've bought the DC!! ---Colourful descriptions, diversified usage of language, fighting scene that seems to get messy ... Nice trailer, Iguana!
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Old 13-06-08, 07:36   #47
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i like boooks by Paolo Coelho..


Also, i have complete series of harry portter huh... been crazy of this bcoz of my nieces. haha
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Old 16-06-08, 00:53   #48
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Just wanted to say that every book has its own time in the life of the reader, for ex. imo 'Crime and Punishment' would seem boring and not fun to read for under 20 y. o.
I read almost all Agatha Kristi's staff and enjoyed it,
Would recommend Conte de Monte Cristo(book is much more fun than the movie, as it gives so many details),
O'Henry short funny stories,
Haggard's 'Montezuma's daughter'(A trip to the Aztec society), '
Capitain Blood' and others from Sabatini(Sea Adventures/Pirates),
Harry Harrison 'Stainless steel Rat'! (SF)

Can anybody recommend any books about wars of Roman Empire, Troy, Alexander, ancient battles kinda staff?

I hope people out there still read books(and not being educated by American stupid comedies and popcorn) and I am glad there is a thread about books on BA. Please try H.Harrison trilogy - you'll love it from the first page.
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Old 30-06-08, 15:15   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nevsky1
Just wanted to say that every book has its own time in the life of the reader, for ex. imo 'Crime and Punishment' would seem boring and not fun to read for under 20 y. o.
I read almost all Agatha Kristi's staff and enjoyed it,
Would recommend Conte de Monte Cristo(book is much more fun than the movie, as it gives so many details),
O'Henry short funny stories,
Haggard's 'Montezuma's daughter'(A trip to the Aztec society), '
Capitain Blood' and others from Sabatini(Sea Adventures/Pirates),
Harry Harrison 'Stainless steel Rat'! (SF)

Can anybody recommend any books about wars of Roman Empire, Troy, Alexander, ancient battles kinda staff?

I hope people out there still read books(and not being educated by American stupid comedies and popcorn) and I am glad there is a thread about books on BA. Please try H.Harrison trilogy - you'll love it from the first page.
Hi, nevsky1!
Personally I've read "A Struggle for Rome" aka "A Fight for Rome" (Felix Dahn) and got good memories of it. - "Pride of Carthage" (David Anthony Durham) is said to be a great book to read about Hannibal and the punic war. - If you got interest in the battle in the Teutoburg Forest, you may want to check these two: "Rome's greatest defeat: massacre in the Teutoburg Forest" (Adrian Murdoch) and "The battle that stopped Rome: Emperor Augustus, Arminius and the slaughter of the legions in the Teutoburg Forest" (Peter S.Wells). Not sure, but I think that both wrote more of that stuff. - German author Gisbert Haefs wrote several good historical novels about Rome/Greece, but seems that his work is not translated in english so far...

http://www.historicalnovelsociety.org/main.htm
http://home.comcast.net/~dwtaylor1/b...alfiction.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_novels
...and maybe Arbiter Elegantiarum wants to drop some words about "Quo Vadis"

ps: I read Harrison's "To the Stars"-Trilogy long time ago, but have to admit that it didn't leave a big impression - at least as far as I remember...
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Old 08-10-08, 13:56   #50
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GOMORA BY ROBERTO SAVIANO,is a great book about the mafia in Naples,it reveals all the secrets from mafia in italy,how they trade illegaly,how they transfer drugs,he gives the names of the bosses,and the people that died from the war of the italian mafia.
I was scocked when i read it.These people dont have any respect for human life,they are killers and not bussinesman,unfortunately this guy is now wanted by the maf,and because of the book he is hiding from the camora.Everyone who is interested on how these totally stupid guys
works should read this book as it is a masterpiece for the 21 century.
The incidents that he writes about is from his real life in the streets of naples.FREEDOM TO ROBERTO.
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Old 06-01-09, 22:22   #51
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According to the situation at the opposite side of the window..

l must recommend you 'Lód'(The Ice) by Jacek Dukaj.
l'm very sorry but it may concern only Polish BA users nowadays as l doubt if it has already been translated.

Anyway, whatever you expect from this book, you'll find it there.
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Old 26-12-09, 12:23   #52
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Just finished reading Declan Hills' - The Fix (Soccer & Organized Crime)

Nice read on how the matches in Europe and Asia were fixed and mostly controlled by the Asian people. And how players are scared shitless when the triads approach them to throw a game sometimes with just verbal threats to kill their family and stuff. International bestseller ! ! !


Preview of - The Fix (Soccer & Organized Crime)


Hill came face-to-face with the multi-billion dollar illegal Asian gambling industry. Over four years, he interviewed more than two hundred people, including professional gamblers, Mafia hitmen, undercover cops, top-level international soccer players, referees, and officials. He met men who claim they have bribed their way into fixing the results of some of the biggest matches in the sport. Initially very sceptical, Hill travelled across four continents to corroborate their stories. He found soccer leagues where mobsters have fixed more than eighty per cent of the games. But most chilling, he met and then was adopted by a small group of match-fixers.
In The Fix, Hill explains the structure and mechanics of illegal gambling syndicates, what soccer players and referees do (or not do) to affect the outcome of their games, why relatively rich and high-status athletes would fix games, how and why club officials would bribe the opposition and how they get referees ***8220;on their side.***8221; Perhaps most shocking is Hill***8217;s discovery that gambling fixers have successfully infiltrated the game, all the way to the top international matches.

The book, however, is not just about match fixing in soccer, the world***8217;s most popular sport. Throughout the text, Hill uses examples from other sports ***8211; tennis, hockey, even rowing ***8211; to show that the credibility of professional sport now lies on a fragile foundation, and it provides enough hints to suspect that all sports above amateur level should look nervously over their shoulder.


Comments:
This book will forever
change the way you
think and feel about
professional sport.
The Fix is the most explosive story of sports corruption in a generation. It presents compelling evidence that some of the highest soccer matches in the world may have been fixed: European Champions League, Olympic and World Cup tournaments.

Intriguing, riveting, and compelling, it tells the story of an investigative journalist, Declan Hill, who set out to examine the world of match-fixing in professional soccer.

"Declan Hill writes a well-researched book, of investigative journalistic brilliance."
--Shaka Hislop, ESPN soccer commentator and former English Premier League and World Cup goalkeeper.
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Old 25-07-10, 23:06   #53
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Highly recommended for every serious punter.

The Smart Money: How the World's Best Sports Bettors Beat the Bookies Out of Millions


In 1997, gaming journalist Konik joined the Brain Trust, a sports-gambling operation that took in millions by beating the Vegas bookies at their own game. This fascinating inside look at the gambling biz (perfectly suited, incidentally, to fans of the recent movie Two for the Money) reveals so much information that you would swear the author was breaking some sort of Omerta-like code of silence; in fact, the parallels between organized gambling and organized crime are numerous. The book created plenty of buzz in the publishing community well before its release, so expect a great deal of publicity and high reader interest. The author conceals the identities of the principal players behind fake names, but his fictionalized stand-ins are so compelling (especially the Brain Trust chieftain, Rick "Big Daddy" Matthews) that the book feels like a mixture of true-life expose and high-stakes fiction (fans of Puzo's Fools Die may see some similarities but only in a good way). A definite must-read for the gambling crowd.

Last edited by stefan2008; 25-07-10 at 23:08.
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Old 11-10-10, 15:40   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jif View Post
Just finished reading Declan Hills' - The Fix (Soccer & Organized Crime)

Nice read on how the matches in Europe and Asia were fixed and mostly controlled by the Asian people. And how players are scared shitless when the triads approach them to throw a game sometimes with just verbal threats to kill their family and stuff. International bestseller ! ! !


Preview of - The Fix (Soccer & Organized Crime)


Hill came face-to-face with the multi-billion dollar illegal Asian gambling industry. Over four years, he interviewed more than two hundred people, including professional gamblers, Mafia hitmen, undercover cops, top-level international soccer players, referees, and officials. He met men who claim they have bribed their way into fixing the results of some of the biggest matches in the sport. Initially very sceptical, Hill travelled across four continents to corroborate their stories. He found soccer leagues where mobsters have fixed more than eighty per cent of the games. But most chilling, he met and then was adopted by a small group of match-fixers.
In The Fix, Hill explains the structure and mechanics of illegal gambling syndicates, what soccer players and referees do (or not do) to affect the outcome of their games, why relatively rich and high-status athletes would fix games, how and why club officials would bribe the opposition and how they get referees “on their side.” Perhaps most shocking is Hill’s discovery that gambling fixers have successfully infiltrated the game, all the way to the top international matches.

The book, however, is not just about match fixing in soccer, the world’s most popular sport. Throughout the text, Hill uses examples from other sports – tennis, hockey, even rowing – to show that the credibility of professional sport now lies on a fragile foundation, and it provides enough hints to suspect that all sports above amateur level should look nervously over their shoulder.


Comments:
This book will forever
change the way you
think and feel about
professional sport.
The Fix is the most explosive story of sports corruption in a generation. It presents compelling evidence that some of the highest soccer matches in the world may have been fixed: European Champions League, Olympic and World Cup tournaments.

Intriguing, riveting, and compelling, it tells the story of an investigative journalist, Declan Hill, who set out to examine the world of match-fixing in professional soccer.

"Declan Hill writes a well-researched book, of investigative journalistic brilliance."
--Shaka Hislop, ESPN soccer commentator and former English Premier League and World Cup goalkeeper.

I am very interested in this book, is there any ebook on the web where can i download it because I didnt find it in the public library or on the web.. Tnx for the help!
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Old 11-10-10, 16:33   #55
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do a google search for "The fix (soccer and organised crime) pdf" plenty of downloads for it but you know how trustworthy some of those d/l sites are.
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Old 11-10-10, 17:41   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CG View Post
do a google search for "The fix (soccer and organised crime) pdf" plenty of downloads for it but you know how trustworthy some of those d/l sites are.
hehe, tnx for the help, i did it already that's precisely the reason why i'm asking here, i dodnt find anything useful..

All in all:if someone finds it i would be really thankfull for the link or something simelar to be posted in my PM. thanks
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Old 11-10-10, 19:09   #57
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So, 2 and a half years later, I'm going to post a few more passages from the more recent writings on my novel (which is near to being completed). I hope that those who enjoyed the first few paragraphs will also enjoy this ones, especially arsenalno1.

************************************************** *******
"You want your reward" asked Arild smiling?
"Don't try to trick me" growled Sarond! "Don't even try it, or you will regret it".
Arild looked at him with contemn and made a sign to Merinox.
"Give him his earned reward".
Merinox took out his sword, ready to strike, when he felt a burning in his throat. He couldn't breathe, and was feeling a stinging pain all over his body. Trying to protect his throat, he dropped the sword and fell to the ground. He saw one of Sarond's hands directed towards him, and when he tried to speak, the only thing that came out of his mouth was a rattle.
Atiron tried to help him, but Sarond stretched his other hand towards the sorcerer, torturing in the same way. The sorcerer also fell on the ground, wriggling with pain. Arild was looking scared at the necromancer. His face no longer kept it's human form. Instead, a hideous skull was starring at Arild.
************************************************** *******
His vision became blurry, but this time, he wasn't feeling any stings, not inside his nose, neither in the back of his head. Several heat waves started hitting him, continuously. Sweat was pouring down on his face when, suddenly, he felt a slight breeze; but only for a moment, as the breeze turned into a powerful storm, as if the entire rage of nature was upon him. Vertax fell to the ground, tormented by the wind blasts that were searching and passing through him. The heat waves were long gone, and now the sweat pouring on his face and back turned into chills. He lay down on the cool floor... waiting... shaking. Visions were coming to his mind, visions or memories... he couldn't tell. He was seeing smiling, familiar faces, images that were setting him at rest, but they were all moving fast, threading with war scenes, blood and death.
************************************************** *******
The kingdom of Skyrim was situated north-east of Torag; populated by the Rantahians, Skyrim was a small region, at the bottom of the mountains, but the standard of living was very high in this area. The Rantahian houses might have appeared as simple, when looked upon from the outside, but the interior was very luxurious, each home having several expensive decorations. Their economy was based on the extraction and commerce of the 'dabis', the precious metal that was changing it's color depending on the surrounding light and the angle from which it is watched, a metal highly appreciated in the entire world, and highly expensive.
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Old 11-10-10, 20:14   #58
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"the fix" is a incredible book..
his stories about the malaysia and singapore soccer with 2 games with more then 26 goals in one halftime.. and the oddfall from 30 to 1,5.. just to crazy..
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Old 15-10-10, 10:41   #59
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It is very nice to see that you have kept writing, Iggy, and I promise you I'll read your book as soon as it is out, and I have learned Romanian, or can find a translated edition

As for a critique, I'd love to give you some constructive critiscism but I'm a simple person and not really sure what to point out... Please keep writing, though, is all I can say, and don't be discouraged by the lack of replies here - sadly, this thread only averages one or two replies every three months.. You are probably better off posting these passages in more dedicated forums

I recognize Skyrim - that's a land in the Elder Scrolls universe. Is your book related to that somehow, like a spin-off/fan fiction, or is it just a coincidence?


As for my own recent reading, it didn't go so well for a while now, as I have some troubles concentrating, so I picked up an easy one to get me started again; the book which the legendary movie Goodfellas is based on. It's not very different, but still interesting to read the story too. Could be worth a quick read for most on here. Got a couple of classics like Of mice and men and Catcher in the rye lined up, and hopefully I'll get into a good reading habit as the winter keeps me inside the house Getting through Homer will be my goal for the next months.
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Old 15-10-10, 13:38   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arsenalno1 View Post
I recognize Skyrim - that's a land in the Elder Scrolls universe. Is your book related to that somehow, like a spin-off/fan fiction, or is it just a coincidence?
Not spin-off, neither a coincidence...

It's more like an easter-egg, as I use some character names, or names of places that are from other works to which I try to pay some sort of a tribute, and Skyrim is indeed taken from the Elder Scrolls.

Thnx a lot for your reply, and be sure you'll be the first to get a copy when (and if) it's going to be published (with an English translation, of course). Thnx and regards!
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